Book Beginnings: Love Comes Softly

The morning sun shone brightly on the canvas of the covered wagon, promising an unseasonably warm day for mid-October. Marty fought for wakefulness, coming slowly out of a troubled and fitful sleep. Why did she feel so heavy and ill at ease–she who usually woke with enthusiasm and readiness for each new day’s adventure? Then it all came flooding back, and she fell in a heap on the quilt from which she had just emerged. Sobs shook her body, and she pressed the covering to her face to muffle the sound.

Clem is gone

I am enjoying this book more than I thought I would when I started. Unfortunately, I’m very busy at the moment, so I’m not reading it very quickly. But isn’t this a really intriguing beginning? Yeah, I left it at a cliff-hanger-y moment for you…

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Book Beginnings is a weekly meme, hosted by Katy at A Few More Pages.
How to participate: Share the first line (or two) of the book you are currently reading on your blog or in the comments. Include the title and the author so we know what you’re reading. Then, if you feel so moved, let us know what your first impressions were based on that first line, and let us know if you liked or did not like the sentence. The link-up will be at A Few More Pages every Friday.

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Book Beginnings: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

I had just come to accept that my life would be ordinary when extraordinary things began to happen.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

I think just the first sentence is enough to get how awesome this book is, at least in the beginning. I really liked the beginning, but I’ve reached a point where I’m not sure how I feel about it. I just keep thinking a certain turning-point was very cheesy 😦 We’ll see–I obviously will be reading the rest anyways.

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Book Beginnings is a weekly meme, hosted by Katy at A Few More Pages.
How to participate: Share the first line (or two) of the book you are currently reading on your blog or in the comments. Include the title and the author so we know what you’re reading. Then, if you feel so moved, let us know what your first impressions were based on that first line, and let us know if you liked or did not like the sentence. The link-up will be at A Few More Pages every Friday.

Book Beginnings: Honolulu and Rebecca

When I was a young child growing up in Korea, it was said that the image of the fading moon at daybreak, reflected in a pond or stream or even a well, resembled the speckled shell of a dragon’s egg. A dragon embodied the yang, the masculine principle of life, and it was thought that if a couple expecting a child prayed to the dragon’s egg, their offspring would be male. Of course, every family in those days desired a son over a daughter. Only men could carry on the family line; women were merely vessels by which to provide society with an uninterrupted supply of men. So every day for months before I was born, my parents would rise before dawn, carrying offerings of fresh-steamed rice cakes to the stone well behind our home, as the sky brightened and snuffed out the stars. And they would pray to the pale freckled face of the moon floating on the water’s surface, pray that the child growing inside my mother’s womb would be a boy.

I am just over two CDs into the 14-CD audiobook version of Honolulu by Alan Brennert. And I wish I could let you read that much, because I have loved the book so far. Ali Ahn has such a melodious voice, and the writing is simply fantastic.

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again. It seemed to me I stood by the iron gate leading to the drive, and for a while I could not enter, for the way was barred to me. There was a padlock and a chain upon the gate. I called in my dream to the lodge-keeper, and had no answer, and peering closer through the rusted spokes of the gate I saw that the lodge was uninhabited.

No smoke came from the chimney, and the little lattice windows gaped forlorn. Then, like all dreamers, I was possessed of a sudden with supernatural powers and passed like a spirit through the barrier before me. The drive would away in front of me, twisting and turning as it had always done, but as I advanced I was aware that a change had come upon it; it was narrow and unkept, not the drive that we had known. At first I was puzzled and did not understand, and it was only when I bent my head to avoid the low swinging branch of a tree that I realised what had happened. Nature had come into her own again and, little by, little, in her stealthy, insidious way had encroached upon the drive with long tenacious fingers.

And this is the amazingly haunting beginning of Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. I’m not as far into this book, but I did watch the film last fall and found a certain character very creepy. I don’t remember many details, but I have the general plot in my memory. I’m hoping the book is a bit more spooky than the film, which I thought would be spookier.

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Book Beginnings is a weekly meme, hosted by Katy at A Few More Pages.
How to participate: Share the first line (or two) of the book you are currently reading on your blog or in the comments. Include the title and the author so we know what you’re reading. Then, if you feel so moved, let us know what your first impressions were based on that first line, and let us know if you liked or did not like the sentence. The link-up will be at A Few More Pages every Friday.

Book Beginnings: Q & A by Vikas Swarup

I have been arrested. For winning a quiz show.

~Q & A by Vikas Swarup

Sounds pretty interesting to me!! And I like how it sort of starts off with a climatic scene. It’ll be interesting to see what sort of story can start with something as huge as winning a quiz show. Can it still get better??

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Book Beginnings is a weekly meme, hosted by Katy at A Few More Pages.
How to participate: Share the first line (or two) of the book you are currently reading on your blog or in the comments. Include the title and the author so we know what you’re reading. Then, if you feel so moved, let us know what your first impressions were based on that first line, and let us know if you liked or did not like the sentence. The link-up will be at A Few More Pages every Friday.

Book Beginnings: Everfree

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Nothing in the sky with nothing. No moon, no stars. Just a canopy of black swallowing the light. Lucky break for the fox. Tough break for the hounds.
~~Everfree by Nick Sagan

This beginning is honestly pretty vague. But if you’ve read this books two predecessors, it’s not too uncommon with the way Sagan occasionally writes and it even makes a bit of sense.

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Book Beginnings is a weekly meme, hosted by Katy at A Few More Pages.
How to participate: Share the first line (or two) of the book you are currently reading on your blog or in the comments. Include the title and the author so we know what you’re reading. Then, if you feel so moved, let us know what your first impressions were based on that first line, and let us know if you liked or did not like the sentence. The link-up will be at A Few More Pages every Friday.

Book Beginnings: Harriet the Spy & Stardust

Harriet was trying to explain to Sport how to play Town. “See, first you make up the name of the town. Then you write down the names of all the people who live in it. You can’t have too many or it gets too hard. I usually have twenty-five.”

Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

I think this paints a pretty good picture of Harriet and how technical and older-than-11 she can be 🙂

There was once a young man who wished to gain his Heart’s Desire.

And while that is, as beginnings go, not entirely novel (for every tale about every young man there ever was or will be could start in a similar manner) there was much about this young man and what happened to him that was unusual, although even he never knew the whole of it.

The tale started, as many tales have started in Wall.

Stardustby Neil Gaiman

I have to admit that while I loved this book the first time around, I actually like the way the story begins in the film (2007) more. Well, that’s not entirely true. I don’t like how the story begins in the film until it starts in with the real story, and not the more “modern” part–basically when Stormhold appears. With the book, there is no “modern” part, looking back to the beginning of the story. It starts in the past and quickly fast forwards to the present (sometime in Victorian England). Regardless, I’m excited to be reading this book again!

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Book Beginnings is a weekly meme, hosted by Katy at A Few More Pages.
How to participate: Share the first line (or two) of the book you are currently reading on your blog or in the comments. Include the title and the author so we know what you’re reading. Then, if you feel so moved, let us know what your first impressions were based on that first line, and let us know if you liked or did not like the sentence. The link-up will be at A Few More Pages every Friday.

Book Beginnings: Home, a Memoir of my Early Years

I am told that the first comprehensible word I uttered as a child was ‘home.’
My father was driving his secondhand Austin 7; my mother was in the passenger seat beside him holding me on her lap. As we approached our modest house, Dad braked the car to turn into the pocket-handkerchief square of concrete by the gate and apparently I quietly, tentatively, said the word.
‘Home.’
My mother told me there was a slight upward inflection in my voice, not a question so much as a trying of the word on the tongue, with perhaps the delicious discovery of connection…the word to the place. My parents wanted to be sure they had heard me correctly, so Dad drove around the lanes once again, and as we returned, it seems I repeated the word.

~Home: A Memoir of My Early Years by Julie Andrews

I love this beginning! It explains right off the meaning behind the title.

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Book Beginnings is a weekly meme, hosted by Katy at A Few More Pages.
How to participate: Share the first line (or two) of the book you are currently reading on your blog or in the comments. Include the title and the author so we know what you’re reading. Then, if you feel so moved, let us know what your first impressions were based on that first line, and let us know if you liked or did not like the sentence. The link-up will be at A Few More Pages every Friday.