Brave New World by Aldous Huxley {audiobook}

TitleBrave New World
Author: Aldous Huxley
Genre: fiction (dystopic)
ISBN: 9780792752257
Length: 8.5 hours
Published: 1932
Source: public library
Rating: 5/5
Challenges/Resolutions: Years of Books Resolution (2012); Years of Books Goal (lifetime)

Summary (from Goodreads):

“Community, Identity, Stability” is the motto of Aldous Huxley’s utopian World State. Here everyone consumes daily grams of soma, to fight depression, babies are born in laboratories, and the most popular form of entertainment is a “Feelie,” a movie that stimulates the senses of sight, hearing, and touch. Though there is no violence and everyone is provided for, Bernard Marx feels something is missing and senses his relationship with a young women has the potential to be much more than the confines of their existence allow. Huxley foreshadowed many of the practices and gadgets we take for granted today–let’s hope the sterility and absence of individuality he predicted aren’t yet to come.

My Thoughts: I think it is fair to say that this is one of my new favorite books. Yes, I tend to LOVE dystopic novels. But I hadn’t realized that people were writing such stories 80 years ago! But, this just goes to show you that dystopic stories are fairly timeless. As it’s always a look at a future world, writers can create any type of society they want and no one can say it won’t happen. So this book, written in the 1930s, reads practically like any other dystopic I’ve read.

There was only one part of the story that I thought dated it a little. And that element was actually a pretty major difference from most other dystopics I’ve read. There exists in this story a population of people from before the transition to “utopia”. Those people are called savages, because they haven’t been civilized or, especially, conditioned. I don’t know that I’ve ever read a book like this where everyone wasn’t forced into the new order. It isn’t like some characters that have always lived in the “utopia” who just want to revert back to a better time and freer state of things–the savages weren’t ever changed. This dates the book because the savages are described as Native Americans. If this book was written today, the “savage” would be very different. (Another slightly dating element is the way time is related. It takes place in 632 AF, After Ford. That would be Henry Ford. I have a feeling if this book hadn’t been written so soon after Ford’s huge success in the auto industry, that it wouldn’t be the way to refer to the year.)

 

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